The Problem with Diablo 3′s Real Money Auction House

In his 2009 TED lecture on Predictable Irrationality, Dan Ariely described the hidden reasons why we sometimes think it’s all right to cheat others for our own benefit. He posits that the reason for

 this is that our intuitions on many things are both wrong and irrational and that we need to subject our intuitions to the scientific method.Ariely goes on to describe an experiment regarding the 

concept of cheating and concludes that people who cheat are often insensitive to the potential economic gains relative to the chance of getting caught. Instead, Ariely says, we are indifferent to 

cheating when we do it in small degrees, as long as we don’t see a change in our own impressions of ourselves.  In these situations, we can rationalize our conduct as not being wrong per se, 

but just as “fudging” ever so slightly. 

Most would agree that the former isn’t as morally repugnant as the latter. Yet, both are technically stealing. When we take home a pencil and notepad we tend to view it as just “fudging.” But 

when we take those few extra dollars from the tip jar, we are moving beyond fudging, and instead entering the realm of what society (and our own intuitions) deem stealing. So, what is really 

going on here? Ariely proposes that the farther we get from real money, the easier it is for us to cheat and/or steal. That’s why we constantly hear news reports of insider trading and securities 

fraud–in each case the item of value isn’t cash, it is an item that represents or acts in place of cash.

What does this have to do with gaming? Well, every video game requires that the player place themselves in the shoes of a digital avatar. This digital avatar then interacts with scripted characters

 in a world with a set of clearly defined rules. Based on the rules of the game, the gamer then determines how to act, i.e. whether to choose the path of a Paragon or Renegade, the Dark Side or

 the Light Side, the hero of the wasteland or scourge of the desert. As such, the gamer and his digital avatar have effectively been given carte blanche to act as either a saint or a villain, with little

 real world consequence. Because of this, the line between what is moral and immoral has been further blurred.

 

Comments are closed.